Málaga, City of Museums

Málaga is often referred to as the City of Museums, so it wouldn’t be right to visit Málaga without visiting museums. We may not have visited all of the them but we gave it a good try. Here are some that we enjoyed.

Picasso Museum Málaga

Pablo Picasso is the most famous son of Málaga (Antonio Banderas as well) and a piece or two of his work can be found in every museum we visited.

The Picasso museum has 3 floors of his works and you can follow the path of how his art was the influenced by the experiences of his life. From his traditional early paintings, to his sculptures and his more famous cubism style art. Picasso is considered one of the greatest painters of his time and it has been estimated that he produced 50,000 pieces of art comprised of paintings, sculptures, ceramics, drawings and more. His work can be found in museums throughout the world. In addition to his paintings, drawings, sculptures and ceramics he also created engravings, illustration of books, writing, and he designed sets and costumes for the theater.

Unfortunately in this museum no photos were allowed, so we only have two taken outside the gallery.

Spring by Pablo Picasso (1956)

Centre Pompidou

Art installation above the Centre Pompidou

Malaga’s Centre Pompidou, is easily identified by the large colorful cube that sits above the building. It does attract your attention. Affiliated with The Center Pompidou in Paris, Malaga’s Centre Pompidou has access to more than 100,000 works that cover an artistic period that extends from 1905 to today.

(to visit our photo gallery click here or on the title or on picture)

Museo del Patrimonio Municipal

The Municipal Heritage Museum (MUPAM) made it on our list, not for the municipal history of Málaga, but because there was a large collection of clay figurines that told the story of Málaga  and Andalucia. These figurines were so well done that you couldn’t help but smile as you examined them.

(to visit our photo gallery click here or on the title or on picture)

Museo de Málaga

The Museo de Málaga was created by combining two museums: the fine arts and the archeological museums.  It was quite large with over 2,000 pieces in the Fine Arts collection and more than 15,000 pieces in the Archeology collection.

(to visit our photo gallery click here or on the title or on picture)

Carmen Thyssen Museum

This museum houses the private collection of Baron Thyssen along with a separate collection of Baroness Thyssen-Bornemisza. The museum was created to conserve and disseminate the Carmen Thyssen Collection in order to emphasize the value of Spanish painting, especially that of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. We think they do a very good job of doing just that. We recommend visiting this museum of primarily Spanish artists.

(to visit our photo gallery click here or on the title or on picture)

Colección del Museo Ruso

This Russian art collection was interesting and there is art dating back from the Byzantine period, through the Soviet era up to current day. There are a number of monumental wall-size paintings as it was common in Russia for four to five artist’s to work on pieces this size.

(to visit our photo gallery click here or on the title or on picture)

Museo Automovilístico y de la Moda

The automobile and fashion museum is an eclectic and lighthearted combination that seems to work. We spent a couple of hours in this museum and walked the entire space twice. The cars were beautiful, the fashion was often a piece that had been worn by someone famous. The cars attract your attention but don’t miss the collection of ladies hats.

(to visit our photo gallery click here or on the title or on picture)

CAC Málaga

The Contemporary Art Center opened in 2003 and focuses on art from the 20th and 21st century. These top artists are from around the world, although there are also a number of Spanish artists represented. There was much that did not resonate with us, however we did find a few gems.

(to visit our photo gallery click here or on the title or on picture)

Woman with Raised Arms by Pablo Picasso (1936)

Pablo Picasso was born in Málaga and there is a statue of him sitting on a bench in Plaza de La Merced. We read that if you rub the Picasso statue on his head, it is believed his creativity will rub off on you. Although that kind of luck would be very welcome and helpful, we didn’t rub his head, so will have to continue creating our blogs without special assistance.

Salud from the Malagueños,

Ted and Julia

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